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FIELD ECOLOGY OF THREATENED AND ENDANGERED SPECIES IN THE NORTHERN ROCKIES

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (ENST) 395
3 UPPER-DIVISION SEMESTER CREDITS

Students gain a first-hand understanding of the ecology of endangered species in the Northern Rockies. We focus on grizzly bears, wolves, lynx and bull trout, studying life history, habitat needs, population status and the main threats to population viability. Students meet in the field with the biologists and agency professionals actively working on conservation. All of our lessons are grounded in daily observations of wildlife and their actual behavior, habitat selection, and interactions with humans in the lands surrounding our rural campus.

WILDLIFE POLICY AND RURAL COMMUNITIES

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (ENST) 395
3 UPPER-DIVISION SEMESTER CREDITS

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This course surveys regulatory and incentive based approaches to wildlife conservation. Students will learn about several of the federal policies that are in place to manage and recover threatened and endangered species with a strong focus on the Endangered Species Act and its many provisions. The course will focus on the impacts of the ESA on rural communities. We will meet with several ranchers, loggers and other rural residents, as well as with public land managers and public interest groups to gain a full appreciation for diverse views in western communities on wildlife conservation issues.

COMMUNITY-BASED APPROACHES TO WILDLIFE CONSERVATION

NATURAL RESOURCE SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT (NRSM) 395
3 UPPER-DIVISION SEMESTER CREDITS

This course surveys emerging conservation strategies which address human-wildlife conflicts in rural areas. Students study efforts in the Swan Valley to mitigate bear conflicts; projects in the Blackfoot Valley to manage wolf depredation on cattle ranches; and Tribal efforts in the Mission Valley to employ citizen anglers in reducing invasive fish species. Students benefit from a mixture of readings, interviews with citizen groups and field tours.


IMAGES:  Faith Bernstein